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20130113
20130121
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
not market -- market all of. gerri: you bring a degree point becausthe first time we had the debt ceiling issue, which is the one now looming in congress, we saved 2,000 points of the stock market. it did not last, thankfully, but it was scary. it may allow the people uneasy. we will -- will leave be in for the same type of problem if we get right up to that deadline and no agreement? >> yes. yes. and that is why we are all annoyed and hopeful that congress will learn alesson and not do a test again because all they're doing getting in our way causing a lot of banks and warrior necessarily for the american public and investors or a wide. gerri: a broader uestion. you're a smart guy and you watch all this stuff. one of the things the we're waiting for, listening tour, s&p, moody's, downgrade are dead again, what will happen? we will be the ramifications? how will that hit individual investor portfolios? >> there is a risk that traditionally when they're is a downgrade of a bond rating the value of the bond goes down as well, which means if you own u.s. government securities you're going to
to the president tomorrow. other hot issues, the debt ceiling and immigration we may be hearing about. we want to know what you would ask the president if you're able to ask him a question. you can tweet us at happening now those questions. jon: sounds good. heather touched on it. vice president joe biden presents his plan to curb gun violence to president obama tomorrow. one city is apparently not waiting around for washington act. chicago quickly becoming ground zero in the debate on gun control. that city saw more than 500 murders last year, prompting mayor rahm emanuel to take action with a gun control plan of his own. steve brown is live in chicago right now, but i guess mayor emanuel is not. he is in d.c. today suggesting democratic strategy to try to get gun control accomplished, is that right, steve? >> reporter: in a sense yes, it was part of the discussion at a public revent held in washington that mayor emanuel took part in. local press was made aware of it well in advance. it touches on the city's most dramatic problem which is gun violence in this city. you mentioned over 500 homi
the way. we've got a debt ceiling issue that the president's going to have to deal with. there are a lot of other issues the president's going to have to deal with, immigration reform. i think the president's going to have to spend time on this whether he wants to or not. >> connie mack, nice to see you. >> nice to see you. >> please tell your lovely wife we're sorry she lost all her luggage and was stuck at the airport. >> love you, honey. >> we'll get back to john berman with a look at some of the other stories ahead this morning. >>> we'll be talking about the golden globes. ben affleck didn't get nominated for an oscar, but his surprise win at the globes may be vindication. we'll have that, the other surprises, and the big snubs in a live report. >>> he's known for his role on "breaking bad," but actor steven michael casada has a new role to play, local school board member. you should know that axiron is here. the only underarm treatment for low t. that's right, the one you apply to the underarm. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18. axiron can transfer to others
broader macro issues, and i think it's the debt ceiling and sequestration talks, are really keeping the lid on the market so i don't suspect you'll see a real move up and through 1475 unless there's clarify coming out of washington. that's what i think the market really wants to hear. >> it sure does. rick, do you want to hear that? >> no, i don't think we will. but i do think the republicans are probably going to be more inclined when they come up with the weekend restreet strategy to pay more attention to the sequester side of the equation, my opinion. i agree with greg ip. if you're looking for the big run up in interest rates in 2013, at least in my opinion, you're going to be disappointed. here's what i still can't reconci reconcile. the beige book didn't give us a positive grow on jobs and on the 30th of month we'll look at the annualized pace of growth in the form of gdp, looking for 1.5%. another year where we don't see big tax revenues coming in because we're not creating a lot of jobs. the economy is growing less than 2%, and we're still bragging about what a great year it
and the democrats on this powerful committee as to who should testify. because i don't think the debt ceiling issue should become such a partisan issue. and i just appeal to the republicans who are having this retreat to realize that they should not place us in that kind of jeopardy. so there will be a hearing. we're going to work on witnesses today, settle them, and i hope the chairman and i will be resolving who will be the witnesses. they get the choice, the majority, but in this case i think there will be consternation as to who they pick and our choice. host: ok, all right. guest: we'll have one witness out of four. host: could it be secretary geithner? guest: no. host: do you think they'll call on him, the republicans? guest: no. host: tony, olive branch, mississippi. republican. hi, tony. caller: good morning. how you doing, senator? guest: where is olive branch? caller: it's down across the street from memphis, tennessee -- mississippi. guest: i've been across the bridge there. host: what's your question or comment? caller: my deal is when you talk about congress and everybody is looking at
over the debt ceiling at all. it wasn't a big issue. i was covering politics for nbc at the time. the debt ceiling increase was seen as a procedure and a very partisan vote then but not something you were reporting on for weeks and months like we have in 2011 then and now on the debt ceiling debate and, of course, what happened in 2011 was a loss to the nation's credit rating. there's big differences between 2006 and now. >> and also, to factor in with the differences you pointed out is how much the president has offered in negotiations. as far as cutting spending, not as if it's been a zero sum game from the white house regarding the nation's spending problem and an acknowledgment of that. >> one of the messages president obama is trying to get across today how much is cut in spending, whether it was in that 2011 debt ceiling agreement in the budget control act, whether it was also the revenue that was increased with the end of the fiscal cliff talks that we had right at the beginning of the new year, tamron. so, president obama said, look, we have really cut a lot of spending.
who have a debt ceiling. people got rid of it, because what jonas is saying, it's political. and the second issue is, i don't want our economy held hostage and run by washington, right now, the buffoons in congress have more power over the economy with the, you know, stupid idea. if we give them this type of power we've hurt ourselves, kick the power away as far as i'm concerned. >> isn't this a dangerous way to enforce fiscal discipline? shouldn't we be doing it because we have a budget and stick with it like most americans have to? >> well, we do have a budget, but the budgets aren't being passed. they're not being adopted. look, anything that keeps the focus on reducing debt and deficit in my mind is a good thing. getting rid of the debt limit is papering over the real uncertainty, which is american consumers, american investors don't know if and when washington will ever adopt a sensible fiscal policy. i wish we had it come up every month. >> gary b. basically steve is saying this eliminates some uncertainty and that would help. we see consumer confidence at lows again.
on this issue. >> as you well know, sir, finding votes for the debt ceiling can sometimes be complicated, you yourself as a member of the senate voted against the debt ceiling increase, and in previous aspects of american history, president reagan in 1985, president george herbert walker bush, and president clinton, deals contingent upon raising the debt ceiling and you yourself, related to debt or budget related maneuvers. and what many people are curious about the new adamant desire on your part not to negotiate that seems to conflict with the entire hire in the modern era of the presidents and the debt ceiling and your own debt ceiling and doesn't it suggest we're going into a default situation because no one is talking to each other about this. >> no, major, i think if you look at the history. getting votes for the debt ceiling is difficult and votes in in town are difficult. i went through this last year. what is different we never saw a situation like we saw last year in which certain groups in congress took such an absolutist position that we came within a few days of defaulting. >> lo
forward on some key issues such as gun control, immigration reform, tries to deal with the debt ceiling. and finally, we're told that the president will push to get the public engaged, engaged in their community, engaged in the issues to put pressure on congress to move the president's initiatives forward, john. this is seen as sort of the stage one or the act one, part two will be the president's state of the union address where he'll add more details to his proposals. >> you split it into acts there, dan, appropriate because we saw the president today, the swearing-in ceremony, but because this is a sunday, we saw him only briefly in the blue room. how has he been spending the rest of the day, and what are his plans for this evening? >> reporter: this evening within this hour, the president will be heading to the building museum for a candlelight reception there. he will be making remarks, but much of the day, you know, was quite busy earlier in the day, then had some down time. the president's still working on his speech. we're told that he's in the final stages. he did a lot of it o
in the politics of that. he has fights around the debt ceiling coming up and to make this the issue, how do you think that will work? >> that's why i wonder how serious he is. i'm not questioning his motives. now he knows for the next two months all we're going to be talking about is the debt ceiling, sequestration, the continuing resolution, ending the fiscal cliff, all of these. >> you're not questioning his motives of what he's suggesting. he'd rather have a conversation about guns than the debt ceiling? >> i think the president is trying to get political support from his base, maybe he feels it strengthens him going into negotiations with the republicans or the fiscal issues. listen these guys won't even ban assault weapons, how can you trust them on taxes and spending. i see it as building up his political position which is not wrong but i don't think in his heart of hearts he thinks he's going to pass any significant legislation. >> congressman king in the studio after my asking all the time. >> i couldn't stay away from you, soledad. >> she's not really a tough interviewer is she? >> she
to face the tax issue, as well. it's not just raising the debt ceiling that he's going to have to deal with. but he's going to have to negotiate with the republicans and perhaps try to change the tax code. all of these things are things he's already signaled he wants to do. what's fascinating is that this is a president who wanted to be a domestic president in the last -- in his first term and he was saddled with an economic situation and two wars to deal with. now is a shot to be that domestic president and make some really big change. but he's going to have to work with republicans in the house in order to get big things accomplished. >> and clearly what he wants to do is have some influence on voters. and though the official announcement is expected today, we do know that obama for america is going to become this nonprofit supporting his agenda. what kind of influence could this have? >> well, i think if you're an obama supporter, you hope it has more influence than it did or what they tried to do during his first term. they talked a lot about this leveraging his campaign which ever
with the fiscal cliff, the debt ceiling, and other pressing issues. and finally radio shack is ending its mobile phone partnership with target. the venture has been unprofitable and radio shack has been unable to negotiate more favorable terms. >>> as you know, the house is set to vote today on a $51 billion superstorm sandy package that has already turned in to a bitter battle over spending. joining us now is congressman frank pallone, who represents the sixth district of new jersey, one of the hardest-hit areas of the jersey shore during the late october storm. and congressman, thank you for being here. this was a late october storm. we are now in january. this is still going back and forth. what's happened? >> well, unfortunately, the package was delayed. it was passed in the senate just before new year's, but then the house speaker refused to take it up, and you know, we were very critical of that, because the bill could have been passed in the house and become law with the president's signature and we'd be in the rebuilding process for the jersey shore right now. but now with more and more
the brink about the debt ceiling. they do want to force the issue about how can they get this president to agree to additional spending cuts? the debt ceiling is a dangerous game. i think they recognize that politically. they'll push -- the question is how -- how do they push on the debt ceiling? do they say, look, we'll give you a short-term extension of the debt ceiling for a certain amount of spending cuts, or we'll give you a long-term extension like you want for even more spending cuts. can they force entitlement reform around medicare, for instance, even some of the -- in their view -- more limited things that the president wants to do around means testing and age and indexing to try to attach that to a debt-limit deal. do they move beyond the debt limit, try to get to the continuing resolutions and those kinds of things? they recognize that this is the only area of leverage that they have, but they want to be careful about it. >> so chuck todd, how does the white house deal with that supposed leverage? >> well, first i think the republicans are hoping that they have a manti te'o
to be a strategy. where does the debt ceiling fit into this? it just ensures that we pay the bills that we already spent. why are they talking about the two issues as if they're the same? >> why do they do a lot of things. but the question as that vote approaches in february or march whenever it's going to be, there are two questions actually. number one will boehner let a vote happen as he did with the fiscal cliff. he did let that vote happen. rick pearlstein mentioned the rule that boehner broke that rule for the fiscal cliff. will he break that rule again knowing that it will only get a certain number of republican votes. that's a. and b, how many republican votes will it get it being a clean debt-limit raising bill attached to no cuts. we assume that democrats would vote for that. it would mean twenty-something or 30 republicans--would that many republicans--i know obama got 85 on the fiscal cliff deal. but this is going to be a tougher vote for republicans on the debt ceiling. will he get 25 or 30. >> john: alex we have 20 second left. let me ask you some republicans are talking about anothe
agree with him on the sense that you don't play with the debt ceiling as the point to which to make cuts. there are other issues coming up like the continuing resolution and sequester cuts where they would like to make their last stand there for cutting getting spending cuts and allow on temporary extension without not much attached to it. >> heather: let's talk about the economy. the president starts his new term. less than 1% rate it as excellent. 9% say it's good shape. that is up a touch from his first inauguration but 91% of voters say economic conditions negatively today. why are we here again? >> you have to wonder. i point you back to november the conditions haven't changed all that much in two months. i would imagine that those exact numbers were the same on election day, and the american people not only re-elected the president but gave us the same senate in the house as we had before. so as much as they are saying economy isn't going well, when they had an opportunity to change things they voted for more of the same. >> heather: you mentioned congress, finally two polls dealin
if congress does not pass the debt ceiling. . it has been less than one month since the tragic shooting at sandy hook elementary in connecticut and the country is deeply divided over the issue of gun control, and the deadline is approaching for vice president joe biden to representative his recommendations to the president which should happen tuesday. cnn's candy crowley is taking up the debate in today's "state of the union" and candy, i understand that you have a pretty outspoken guest on the show. >> well, a couple of them. david keene who is the president of the national rifle association and also we will talk to the new senator from connecticut chris murphy and i spoke to him a month ago up there on the scene at newtown, and then we want to try to take a look of this from a bipartisan approach if that is possible. there is a new group forming with senator joe manchin who is a democrat from west virginia and jon huntsman who was a presidential candidate a moderate who is trying to form this group to form bipartisanship, and is that possible anymore? we want to look at gun debate thr
macgs? >> this is an important issue. we do have things to worry about like unemployment and debt ceiling, but this is big. basically what was happening it was on the menu. it said champagne and champagne technically comes from a part of france. >> gregg: a region of france. >> right and the lobbyists went crazy over this. u.s. law says as long as you show the origin of the grapes it's already but they put california on the right side and on the left side -- >> only the french would get upset about that. >> gregg: the problem is there is too many lobbyists in washington. we put on green room on this. it's astonishing. there are 12,051 lobbyists that are actively lobbying. >> $3.3 billion in one year. >> gregg: i didn't do that. if you do the math, 22 lobbyists for every single member of congress? >> yes. >> gregg: there 22 to one in lobbyists. >> there are a lot of lobbyists. >> gregg: there is a lot of influence peddling going on in washington, d.c. >> to me this champagne issue popped my cork. >> gregg: they ought to switch to martinis? >> i think they would all be happier, cham
not support raising the debt ceiling without reducing government spending at the same time. the consequences of failing to increase the debt ceiling are real, but so, too, are the consequences of allowing our spending problem to go unresolved." joining us is amy kremer, chairwoman of the tea party express. thanks for coming in this morning. >> thanks for having me. >> safe bet you're against raising the debt ceiling without spending cuts. >> the problem is the spending cuts never come. the republicans find themselves in the situation all the time t happened with reagan and bush 41 and with the sequester, it's been put off for two months, the spending cuts never come and we cannot continue down this path with over $16 trillion in debt, and a deficit of $1.4 trillion to $1.6 trillion per year. we're spending $1.6 million per year than we're bringing in. >> you've accused the president of using scare tactics. what do you mean by that? do you think he's lying about what could happen? >> the thing is, you know what, first of all it's not congress that determines if we default. it's the treasury s
ahead of debt ceiling conversations, days after fiscal cliff negotiations. was that deal good for poor people? >> for 30 years, we have not addressed this issue, except for the wonderful work that you and cornel are doing in these wonderful people on the panel. politics has neglected the poor. one could say that there was a war on the poor rather than a war on poverty for much of this period. the united states has by far the most poverty of any of the high-income countries as a share of the population. we have the highest in quality. we have the most entrenched underclass. we have had the biggest increases of any quality by far, and we've had the least political response of any high- income countries, so we are standing out on our own. this has been a 30-year trend of soaring in comes at the top, stagnation in the middle, and falling through the floor on the bottom, and the political system has refused to address this for 30 years. so we have reached a calamitous situation in this country, but the fact of the matter is nothing that was done at the fiscal cliff and what lies ahead most
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)